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Keel Hunt is a regular columnist for The Tennessean and the USA Today Network, avid photographer, and now the author of his second book "Crossing the Aisle: How Bipartisanship Brought Tennessee to the 21st Century and Could Save America," debuting in October.

 
 

 A tight senate race is Upon Us: MarshA Blackburn (R) vs. Phil Bredesen (D)

A tight senate race is Upon Us: MarshA Blackburn (R) vs. Phil Bredesen (D)

Red state, blue state: Consider the 'crossover effect' — it happens

Keel Hunt, Columnist for The Tennessean
Published 12:00 p.m. CT Aug. 24, 2018 | Updated 9:09 a.m. CT Aug. 25, 2018

If you are keeping score at home, here’s the key political question in Tennessee’s nationally watched U.S. Senate race, which will end just 10 weeks from Tuesday:

Will enough Republican voters “cross over” this fall and help elect the Democrat, former Gov. Phil Bredesen?

The very idea of this scenario must be Republican Marsha Blackburn’s worst nightmare. But just as this longtime Democratic state turned red over the past half-century, there is in fact much Tennessee tradition for crossover voting. [READ MORE]



How to agree on what a modern city like Nashville costs

Keel Hunt, Columnist for The Tennessean

Published 12:00 p.m. CT June 29, 2018

So we won’t be paying higher property taxes starting this weekend after all. 

Turns out, it was a real possibility and closer than anyone thought. Councilman Bob Mendes gave it his best effort, arguing that a 50-cent increase was the right thing to do — in a highly unusual budget crunch — to be fair to police officers, firefighters, teachers and the rest.

He came close to winning, too. After a good debate, Metro Council split right down the middle on the tax question. On June 19, they voted 19-19. (It doesn’t get any closer than that in the third-largest city council in America.) The acting vice mayor, Sheri Weiner, then cast the tiebreaker, voting against.

No tax hike. No raises. No way. Not this year. [READ MORE]

 A GrowING MODERN CITY COMES AT A COST

A GrowING MODERN CITY COMES AT A COST


 Lewis LAvine was a Champion for Transit, And my Trusted Friend.

Lewis LAvine was a Champion for Transit, And my Trusted Friend.

What Nashville must do about transit now

Keel Hunt, Columnist for The Tennessean
Published 12:00 p.m. CT May 11, 2018 | Updated 3:51 p.m. CT May 14, 2018

One of my best friends in the world died last week. Lewis Lavine had been my bud, colleague and confessor since the fall of 1977.

As much as I grieve for him now, I am certain the last thing he would want is for any of us to spend one more minute mourning him when there is important civic work to be done.

For Lewis, in his later years, that work was about modern transit.

It was the last civic project that Lewis poured his skills and talent into, dating from the time he was chairman of Nashville’s Metropolitan Transit Authority. [READ MORE]